Does Your Favorite Soda have BPA in It?

By: Shane Ellison, MS
Comments  

I try not to let anything ruin my fun. And I’ll be damned if the plastic toxin known as BPA is going to stop me from drinking soda. But it almost did.

BPA is used in the food and drink packaging industry for its durability and versatility. The risks to health and longevity are enormous though, and have been known since the early 1900’s. Primarily, it throws hormone harmony out of whack, which means it’s a toxic gender bender that can cause women to grow a fuzzy upper lip and men tits. Later, cancer can manifest and claw-out your insides. It’s horrid for babies too.

If You Want to Live Longer, Stop Consuming BPA

“Trace BPA exposure has been shown to disrupt the endocrine system and trigger a wide variety of disorders, including chromosomal and reproductive system abnormalities, impaired brain and neurological functions, cancer, cardiovascular system damage, adult-onset diabetes, early puberty, obesity and resistance to chemotherapy.” – Environmental Working Group (www.ewg.org)

BPA is Rampant

Despite the risks, BPA is rampant, even among the organic food industry. And sometimes, it’s used heavily as a lining for aluminum cans. Under certain processing methods, BPA can leach into your refreshing, nostalgic drink. In addition to drinking myself into The Fat Cow Hall of Fame, that’s one of many reasons I quit conventional soda for good. Then I found Zevia brand soda – the first all-natural, diet soda company.

Does Zevia Contain BPA?

Zevia kicks ass. Their flavors model our favorite drinks growing up, and actually taste better and won’t grant you with the usual stomach ache, belly fat, heart disease or cancer that can follow years of use.

But, before I made the Zevia recommendation to tens of thousands via my PC Reality TV Clip titled, 9 Year Old Skips School to Drink Soda, I wanted to make sure it didn’t have BPA. Therefore, just like I did in Over-The-Counter Natural Cures, I paid for third party lab tests to verify purity. And because BPA behaves differently at various temperatures, I tested at room temp. and after 24-hours of refrigeration.

Without seeing the tests for themselves, some people – like my 9 year old daughter – questioned my assertion that BPA was not present in Zevia. Therefore, I wanted to provide the results so they could see them with their own eyes.

What about other Toxins?

As I read the results, I was stoked to see that there was no BPA. I immediately cracked a can of Mountain Zevia and chugged it. Instantly, I was taken way back to hot summer days of chewing Copenhagen and chugging Moutain Dew while swinging from ropes into the Animas River, and nursing hangovers. Then my alter ego stepped in, The People’s Chemist. Dick.

BPA free doesn’t mean safe. Just as there are an endless supply of dorky, natural cure gurus, so too is an endless supply of toxins – you have to know what you’re looking for. In addition to bisphenol-A (BPA), the can industry uses a molecular cousin known as Bisphenol A diglycide (BADGE) 75% of the time! So I tested for that too. My guzzling didn’t skip a bit. Zevia is BADGE free!

Where to Buy Zevia

Being healthy doesn’t require sacrifice, just smarts. Think before you drink. Or simply sign up for my Natural Cures Watchdog (above, right) and let me do all the hard work, while you have all the fun plunging into cold rivers and masking hangovers with Mountain Zevia! Prolly want to skip the Copenhagen.

Drink up. Find Zevia at http://www.amazon.com.

About the Author

Shane "The People's Chemist" Ellison holds master's degree in organic chemistry and is the author of Over-The-Counter Natural Cures (SourceBooks). He's been quoted by USA Today, Shape, Woman's World, US News and World Report, as well as Women's Health and appeared on Fox and NBC as a medicine and health expert. Start living young by signing up for his FREE Natural Cures Watchdog below.

Do Your Vitamins Work?
Get FREE Weekly Health Alerts to Find Out